Video 31 Aug 1,451 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ruth Marshall

RUTH MARSHALL brings attention to illegal wildlife trade and species loss in a way that unites a new, widened audience of scientists, art enthusiasts and the general public. Her textile pelts exemplify how artisan goods have the potential to have higher commercial value than a poached skin on the black market. The result would be a paradigm shift of the incentive in wildlife trade, which is one of the largest illegal activities in the world. Her textiles reinforce that support of conservation and a society’s culture is a more sustainable, viable and lucrative endeavor than the illegal wildlife trade.

Website

via Craftgasms.
Photo 31 Aug 380 notes dogshaming:

Love is blind

Mavis loves the fake owl in our backyard. They spend a lot of time surveying the yard.

dogshaming:

Love is blind

Mavis loves the fake owl in our backyard. They spend a lot of time surveying the yard.

via Dogshaming.
Photo 31 Aug 33 notes epicmovieposters:

Jurassic Park
Photo 31 Aug 229 notes patagonia:

All hail the mighty Skogafoss in Iceland, a tower of water.Submitted by Sean Ensch Images
Instagram @sean_ensch_images
Tumblr http://seanenschimages.tumblr.com

Hail! Hail!

patagonia:

All hail the mighty Skogafoss in Iceland, a tower of water.

Submitted by Sean Ensch Images

Instagram @sean_ensch_images

Tumblr http://seanenschimages.tumblr.com

Hail! Hail!

via Patagonia.
Text 30 Aug

Impromptu entertaining. I’m gonna be so fucking hungover in the morning.

Audio 29 Aug 566 notes

pickinguptheshattered:

"Times Like These" by Foo Fighters 

In light of the shitty week everyone seems to have had…

Played 3,071 times. via Music Blog: Modern Break Up Songs.
Link 29 Aug 29 notes Laura Ingalls Wilder Appreciation Post»

literaturehasruinedme:

Ever since I was little this woman has been my heroine, and today would have been her 147th birthday. She was born in 1867 in Wisconsin, and was one of the early American pioneers.

image

From a young age Laura was expected to help out in any way she could, be that milking, cleaning, cooking or making haystacks. She had the most difficult life, and yet never once complained, her life was all about dealing with what they had.
At age twelve her elder sister, Mary, went blind, and her father went away to work. I quote from her books: Now she was alone; she must take care of herself. When you must do that, then you do it”. The winter she was fourteen, the entire little town she lived in (De Smet, South Dakota) was snowed in, and no food or trains could get through for months, leaving the family nearly starving. This impacted on her height, meaning as an adult, she was only 4’11”.
Aged only fifteen, Laura left home and became a schoolteacher twelve miles from her home in order to support her family, earning twenty dollars a month. She hated it, but felt the need to pay her family back for bringing her up. Her future husband, Almanzo Wilder, ten years her senior, took it upon himself to bring her home on Friday nights so she could spend the weekend with her family. She continued to work, dipping in and out of school herself and keeping none of her wages in order to allow Mary to stay at a college for the blind in Iowa. As well as this, in her late teens, in between teaching, and sometimes on Saturdays whilst teaching, Laura worked as a dressmaker, often eleven hour days for as little as 25 cents a day. She worked extremely hard, and was also hugely self-motivated, constantly worried that she wouldn’t pass Teaching Examinations and that Mary would have to leave College because there was no money. She never graduated.
She got married at eighteen, and had her daughter at nineteen, and overcame diphtheria, drought, debt and the death of her baby son. The little family later moved to Missouri where she and Almanzo worked hard (she as a seamstress, he as a labourer) to eventually buy their own land, and run a successful farm. Laura was recognised as a minor expert in poultry farming and rural living, and was respected in the area.
She later held a collumn in the Missouri Ruralist, and still later became an accomplished writer, publishing the ‘Little House’ books that made me love her.
She was a brave, and determined woman who never complained at what her life gave her. Grateful for everything, she should be a lesson to us all.

Photo 28 Aug 1,148 notes beatnikdaddio:

bedroom goal(s).
egeekdad:

1982 - Space Bedroom

beatnikdaddio:

bedroom goal(s).

egeekdad:

1982 - Space Bedroom

(Source: thriftstorescans)

Photo 28 Aug 54 notes leprincelointain:

Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902), Fir Trees & Storm Clouds - 1870

leprincelointain:

Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902), Fir Trees & Storm Clouds - 1870

Photo 27 Aug 75 notes Let’s go!

Let’s go!

(Source: bishopdane)


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